Spring Photo Projects

Avian Photography 1

With Spring in the air (if not already sprung), many of us are out and about brimming with photo ideas after being cooped up for a chilly winter.  What's that you say?  No photo projects brimming yet?  No problem - here's a few to get you started:

1.  The Call of the Birds: Avian photography has always been something of an art form, with many of the hard core, die hard types venturing way out into the boonies of mountains, hills, lakes, and other far-reaching places.  For the rest of us though, it's tough to find the resources (time and money) to go to the birds, so another option is to bring the birds to you!  Buy some bird feeders and see what comes!  My folks have several bird feeders in upstate New York, and every time I visit, there are birds flying everywhere.  Pine cones with peanut butter, humming bird feeders with sugar water, and even just a plain old bird bath with feed from your local DIY store can bring a bounty of birds to your doorstep!

Avian Photography 1

Avian Photography 2

2.  Join a photo group: We're everywhere!  From ASMP groups to NAPP groups, Meetup groups, and WPPI, you can find groups for pretty much anything ranging from professional development, to studio lighting, and just groups of photographers that like to get out and shoot together for the love of the craft and the camraderie of it all!  I'm a member of several local groups, all via the site Meetup.com, and I don't have to pay a cent to participate!  (I do contribute though, just because I like supporting such efforts...)

3.  Shooting in a park:  Get some photographer-friends, family-friends, or just some friends to join you in a park.  Set up a blanket, a few light stands, and have some park-type food available:  (crackers, cheese, water, whatever).  Add an ipod with some speakers for a little music.  Offer gag prizes for people who dance, act silly, or pose for the camera.  Process the photos and post online so they can share, download, add to Facebook, Twitter, or print!  Low cost, fun, and helps to build your portfolio!

The ideas are only limited by your creativity!  Got your own ideas for photographic opportunities this Spring?  Sound off in the comments to share, encourage, and inspire others!  Happy shooting, and we'll see you back here next time!


Canon 40D For Sale Cheap!

Photo May 04, 8 11 06 AM

Goodnight Sweetheart, it's time to go!

Yes, it's come time to brush the dust off the Canon 40D and let it go on to a new owner. I've owned this for a number of years, and it's been absolutely wonderful to me. It's still got a lot of life left to give though for the right beginner, as a backup, or even as a rental if you run workshops, seminars, etc. and could use something like this. Not asking a lot - the eBay auction is starting at $250, and it includes a lot of extras:

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For anyone interested, or if you want to forward this on to anyone who might be interested, here's the link to the eBay auction:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272232835822?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649

The Iconic Photographers

Joe Rosenthal

Recently I wrote what was likely one of my most popular posts that showcases some of the most iconic photographs I've seen of all time. In the comments, several people mentioned that the article would be more complete if I also included details on the photographers. So, with that in mind, I thought it would be appropriate to take some time to acknowledge the iconic photographers that made these amazing photographs.

The Flag Raising at Iwo Jima

Taken by photographer Joe Rosenthal.

His Pulitzer Prize for the photo was only part of his story. The part that is perhaps more striking is that he tried to become an Army photographer to serve his country, but was turned away.  Undeterred, he joined the Associated Press and made his way to the Pacific Theater. There he went on to document the events in that capacity.  He went on in his photographic career to work as the chief photographer and manager of Times Wide World Photos as well as a lengthy career of 35 years for the San Francisco Chronicle.

Joe Rosenthal

He received numerous citations and awards as a result of his efforts at Iwo Jima.  The photograh was used as the inspiration for the Iwo Jima Memorial, was used in a postage stamp and is also featured at the Marine Recruiting Center in SC.

Omayra Sanchez

Taken by French Photographer Frank Fournier.

Fournier originally studied medicine, following in the footsteps of his father. He ultimately switched to photography for Contact press Images.  His full bio and some sample images of his are on display over at their website.  His humanitarian efforts in photography have been most impressive, and are worthy of mention here as well.  I'd include his photo, but since it has copyright identification, and is not clearly identified for GNU licensing, will simply point anyone interested in his profile over at Contact Press.

Kennedy Salute

Taken by Stan Stearns

Stearns took this photograph while serving as a photographer for Stars and Stripes, and later for UPI.  He passed away recently and an obituary was written up in the New York Times. It showcases some of his more recent works.  The write-up itself involves a very interesting story surrounding the photo and is something of a controversy of its own.  He also has an archive of images over at Corbis. Again, to respect copyright, his image has not been included here.

Tank Man- was taken by Jeff Widener.  Born in the U.S., Widener is most well-known for his photo of the lone student protesting in Tianamen Square during the Bejing Riots.  He's worked as an AP Picture Editor on a number of impressive assignments, and continues his photographic endeavors from Hamburg Germany.  He has received several awards, has lectured and also been the subject of a number of interviews, and these are all well-documented in his Wikipedia Page, which includes a portrait photo, shown below.  You can also check out his online presence and portfolio from his own website here.

Jeff Widener

 VJ Day in Times Square

Taken by noted photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt.

Eisenstaedt is probably one of the most pre-eminent photographers whose photos were showcased recently.  His career spanned 43 years, including 90 covers on Life Magazine.  His documentary efforts include many notable images, including the VJ Day photograph. He is probably one of the most widely recognized candid photographers of our century.  There are several references to Alfreds' work and contributions ranging from his Wikipedia page, his M Gallery Biography, and a selection of his prints are available from The Monroe Gallery as well.  If you really want to know the man behind the photos, you should consider his book (available on Amazon here):  Eisenstaedt on Eisenstaedt: A Self Portrait.

Alfred Eisenstaedt

There you have it! A more in-depth look at some of the photographers behind the Ten Most Iconic Photographs of All Time.  Thanks for stopping by the blog this week.  Safe travels for those who must journey back after their own holiday trips.  Keep on shooting, and remember the shoulders of those we stand upon.  Endeavor to honor them by taking and making the best photographs you can!