The Iconic Photographers

Joe Rosenthal

Recently I wrote what was likely one of my most popular posts that showcases some of the most iconic photographs I’ve seen of all time. In the comments, several people mentioned that the article would be more complete if I also included details on the photographers. So, with that in mind, I thought it would be appropriate to take some time to acknowledge the iconic photographers that made these amazing photographs.

The Flag Raising at Iwo Jima

Taken by photographer Joe Rosenthal.

His Pulitzer Prize for the photo was only part of his story. The part that is perhaps more striking is that he tried to become an Army photographer to serve his country, but was turned away.  Undeterred, he joined the Associated Press and made his way to the Pacific Theater. There he went on to document the events in that capacity.  He went on in his photographic career to work as the chief photographer and manager of Times Wide World Photos as well as a lengthy career of 35 years for the San Francisco Chronicle.

Joe Rosenthal

He received numerous citations and awards as a result of his efforts at Iwo Jima.  The photograh was used as the inspiration for the Iwo Jima Memorial, was used in a postage stamp and is also featured at the Marine Recruiting Center in SC.

Omayra Sanchez

Taken by French Photographer Frank Fournier.

Fournier originally studied medicine, following in the footsteps of his father. He ultimately switched to photography for Contact press Images.  His full bio and some sample images of his are on display over at their website.  His humanitarian efforts in photography have been most impressive, and are worthy of mention here as well.  I’d include his photo, but since it has copyright identification, and is not clearly identified for GNU licensing, will simply point anyone interested in his profile over at Contact Press.

Kennedy Salute

Taken by Stan Stearns

Stearns took this photograph while serving as a photographer for Stars and Stripes, and later for UPI.  He passed away recently and an obituary was written up in the New York Times. It showcases some of his more recent works.  The write-up itself involves a very interesting story surrounding the photo and is something of a controversy of its own.  He also has an archive of images over at Corbis. Again, to respect copyright, his image has not been included here.

Tank Man- was taken by Jeff Widener.  Born in the U.S., Widener is most well-known for his photo of the lone student protesting in Tianamen Square during the Bejing Riots.  He’s worked as an AP Picture Editor on a number of impressive assignments, and continues his photographic endeavors from Hamburg Germany.  He has received several awards, has lectured and also been the subject of a number of interviews, and these are all well-documented in his Wikipedia Page, which includes a portrait photo, shown below.  You can also check out his online presence and portfolio from his own website here.

Jeff Widener

 VJ Day in Times Square

Taken by noted photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt.

Eisenstaedt is probably one of the most pre-eminent photographers whose photos were showcased recently.  His career spanned 43 years, including 90 covers on Life Magazine.  His documentary efforts include many notable images, including the VJ Day photograph. He is probably one of the most widely recognized candid photographers of our century.  There are several references to Alfreds’ work and contributions ranging from his Wikipedia page, his M Gallery Biography, and a selection of his prints are available from The Monroe Gallery as well.  If you really want to know the man behind the photos, you should consider his book (available on Amazon here):  Eisenstaedt on Eisenstaedt: A Self Portrait.

Alfred Eisenstaedt

There you have it! A more in-depth look at some of the photographers behind the Ten Most Iconic Photographs of All Time.  Thanks for stopping by the blog this week.  Safe travels for those who must journey back after their own holiday trips.  Keep on shooting, and remember the shoulders of those we stand upon.  Endeavor to honor them by taking and making the best photographs you can!

Photography Reflections

Water Reflections

Photography Reflections

After last week’s post where I asked for your thoughts, a number of readers have voted for more articles.  This is great insight, and thanks to everyone who stopped in to vote.  It gave me a lot to consider and reflect on in terms of where the next chapter of this photography blog takes me, you, and us – sort of a photography reflections, if you will.

Part One – To continue or not

Part of the goal there was to see where you wanted me to take the blog, or even if it is worth pursuing further.  As we all know, the time to devote to hobbies is a precious commodity which many of us have in short supply.  This means that in order for me to justify the time spent – whether it’s personal gratification or financial, or even a kind word now and then, at least one if not many of those elements need to be present.

With the supersaturation of blogs, articles, podcasts and content in the photography space, it’s hard to justify from a financial or the support of the online community.  No one comments on blogs anymore it seems – at least, I should say from my perspective that is the case.  Others may command a large audience, but I am definitely not in the top producers of content in terms of “market share”.  Others are better at it, can devote more time to it, and can reap rewards from all of the above three categories.

This means that the only reason I have anymore is personal gratification.  It’s tough to justify continuing to publish content when it seems I am speaking to a silent audience, so I would ask that if you like an article, post, or other topic – please let me know.  I like to see comments, insights, thoughts, and feedback from others.  If you’re so inclined to say thanks – consider buying me a cup of coffee to help with the ongoing cost of maintaining this site.  I have decided not to pursue ad revenue or eBook revenue at this time primarily because the market share/visibility just isn’t there.

These are my mental reflections from over the last seven days.  But in keeping with that themne – I have some photographic reflections to share as well.  This time of year is great for reflection-themed photography because it’s nearly Spring!  Lots of rain means lots of puddles, and the reflections that can come from these environments can really be a lot of fun.  It doesn’t matter whether you are shooting with an SLR, a mirrorless, point-and-shoot, or even your smart phone  – it’s more about creating compelling content.  Case in point – three photos I took last week:

image1 image2 image3

In Photography Timing is Everything!


About two weeks ago I was taking the dog for her morning constitutional in the park. I was particularly struck by the fall foliage that surrounded me at the time, suggesting that my photography timing was nearly perfect for the season: IMG_4002.JPG

Sure enough, when we wast forward two weeks to yesterday afternoon at the same location, the colors were much more subdued, the blue skies gone (replaced with gray), and the water reflecting the same flat colors of the environment:


It’s not quite the same scene now is it? The teaching point here is that beautiful photographs are not just pointing your camera at anything and expecting it to be this wonderful thing. Making great photos takes time and commitment.

It also takes having some sort of creative vision. Countless people upload photos to Flickr, Smugmug and the like daily. Most are coming from mobile devices these days. Few are good, and even fewer inspire. If you want to inspire, find that vision, and make it happen.  That means your photography timing, in addition to your photographic vision, your photographic skills, your photographic composition, and so much more all need to sync up to create that magical scene!

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again – beautiful photography comes from within. What do you want to capture?