For this week (and the foreseeable future), I am continuing the “live video talks” where I share a little insight into things I use and do to with photography, and the gear that’s involved.  This week, I recall that some others have done a “What’s in Your Bag?” type of theme, and rather than just show you my gear (which is what the question basically is a lead-in for), I also share some different bags and bag systems I have used, and that I continue to use.  Bag types range from small shoulder bags, to belt systems, backpacks, and equipment bags.  One bag I did not include is one for your tripod and/or light stand.

 

Anyway, it’s kind of a bandwidth intensive episode this week at over 100 MB of download in Quicktime ® format.  Sorry, again, no flash-based version.  Until Camtasia can import .mov files and render as Flash, when I record in QT, the .mov format is all I can do.

 

With that in mind, I’d like to also open it up to the readers/viewers out there.  What kinds of bags or bag systems do you use?  Backpacks?  Belts?  Shoulder bags?  What works best for you?  Sound off in the comments!

 

5 thoughts on “Backpacks, and Belts and Bags: Oh My!

  1. Lowepro does seem to be a favorite brand of bags. I like the idea of the SlingShot for walkabout type activity. On the straps, I’ve heard really good things about UPStraps, but those are intended more for camera bodies rather than camera bags.

    Thanks guys – always fun to see the ideas and gear that works for others.

  2. Just yesterday, I bought a Lowepro SlingShot 200 AW. My old sling bag broke and I needed a new one. Wanting to get a quality bag, I sprung for the Lowepro.

    I have to say, I love this thing after just a day or two with it. It slings over one shoulder diagonally, and when I need to snag my camera fast, I just swing it around and grab it using the side pocket designed for quick access, without having to take the bag off. It’s pretty awesome.

    As someone who photowalks every day, this quick access is important to me. Throw in the extra padding, the extra strap for stability, and it’s tough to beat. It cost me $100, but I think it was worth it. I can easily carry my Canon 20D, two extra lenses (one is a 70-300 Sigma), a Vivitar 285HV flash, extra NiMH AAs, a few lens filters, a space blanket (makes a great collapsible reflector), flash cards, camera batteries, and a few more accessories such as ball bungies and a Wein Peanut optical slave.

  3. Unfortunately it seems no one bag can be perfect for every situation. I use a backpack, two different sizes of shoulder bags, or a beltpack depending on where I’m going and what equipment I want to carry with me. I have a writeup with further descriptions of the camera bags I use and when: http://ww.ordinarylight.com/articles/camera-bags.php

    I don’t use a bag for my primary tripod (which uses a shoulder strap) but I do have a long, skinny bag for my lighting gear (stands, umbrella, ball bungees, etc). It’s a no-name brand bag that I found on the big auction site under a search for “lightstand bag”.

    Thanks for another well-done video, Jason. Keep up the good work.

  4. I really like the LowePro ProMag2 AW Shoulder Bag. I don’t like the single strap on it though – hurts my shoulders. As a result, I use a set of cool backpack straps meant for disc golf bags (disc golf is a hobby of mine). You can check out more about the straps here:

    http://professionalsnapshots.com/blog/archives/28

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *